Four Faves and a Fairy Ring

By Doug Jackson Being asked to name my four favorite poets is like being asked to name my favorite member of the Trinity. One despairs, because the very act of choosing involves heresy; then one rejoices, realizing that one cannot choose One without in fact choosing the essential unity of all and each. So here …

Form, Conformity and Deformity: Thoughts on the Sonnet

by Doug Jackson William Wordsworth wrote (to my knowledge) two sonnets about sonnets. In one, "Nuns Fret Not At Their Convent's Narrow Room," he compares the fourteen-by-five poetic rubric to a monastery, a contemplative's cell, a library, a machine, and a flower. In each case, the poet argues, boundaries channel energy to feed art. The …

The New Year, a Muse in Overalls, and William Wordsworth’s “Ode to Duty”

Ode to Duty by William Wordsworth "Jam non consilio bonus, sed more eo perductus, ut non tantum recte facere possim, sed nisi recte facere non possim" "I am no longer good through deliberate intent, but by long habit have reached a point where I am not only able to do right, but am unable to …

The Landscape of Memory

The Landscape of Memory by Dr. Holly Ordway “I gazed—and gazed—but little thought / What wealth the show to me had brought.” William Wordsworth reminds us, in “Daffodils,” of something that is easy to miss: that memory is a treasure-house. When I revisit something in memory, it is not daydreaming, but rather a use of …

What Wealth the Show to Me Had Brought: Simple Beauty in Wordsworth’s “Daffodils”

What Wealth the Show to Me Had Brought: Simple Beauty in Wordsworth's "Daffodils" by Crystal Hurd I wandered lonely as a cloud That floats on high o'er vales and hills, When all at once I saw a crowd, A host, of golden daffodils; Beside the lake, beneath the trees, Fluttering and dancing in the breeze. …

“Such a Jocund Company”: Scanning Wordsworth’s “Daffodils”

“Such a Jocund Company”: Scanning Wordsworth’s “Daffodils” By Andrew Lazo   This month, I shall try to thread a little needle in writing about William Wordsworth’s “The Daffodils” (or “I Wandered Lonely as a Cloud”). One of my dear fellow Muses always appreciates it when I do a close reading of a poem, trying to …